Scorecard - 115th Congress

The scorecard tracks Natural Resources referred bills that have been voted on at a Committee Markup or on the House Floor. For further information on the bills or to see how your Member of Congress voted, click on the Roll Call Link. We hope this serves as a valuable tool in keeping Congress accountable for supporting and opposing legislation that safeguards our nation’s natural resources.

To View the 114th Congress Scorecard, Click Here.

Bill Overview

Description

Grijalva's Position

Committee Votes

House Floor Votes

H.R. 1654, Water Supply Permitting Coordination Act (Water, Power and Oceans), April 27, 2017

H.R. 1654 - Bill Text

Sponsor: Tom McClintock (R)

California's 4th District

This bill would impose arbitrary deadlines for completing key environmental reviews for new dams and creates an ill-conceived new review process that fails to overlap with the existing review process established under key laws such as the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Oppose

This bill is BAD for the environment

Passed

24-16

Roll Call Link

 
H.R. 1769, San Luis Unit Drainage Resolution Act (Water, Power and Oceans), April 27, 2017

H.R. 1769 - Bill Text

Sponsor: David Valadao (R)

California's 21st District

H.R. 1769 would approve a flawed settlement agreement that waives $375 million currently owed to taxpayers by the Westlands Water District in California. The bill fails to include key safeguards to ensure that toxic drainage water from the Westlands Water District does not threaten California's environment and natural resources. Oppose

This bill is BAD for the environment

Passed

23-16

Roll Call Link

 

Ammendment No.1

            Sponsor: Jared Huffman (D)

                  California's 2nd District

This amendment requires any official or employee of the executive branch to recuse themselves fromthe implementation of the Westlands settlement agreement if they awere registered as a Federal lobbyist for Westlands in the past 5 years.  Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

16-24

Roll Call Link 

 

Ammendment No.2

            Sponsor: Jared Huffman (D)

                  California's 2nd District

This amendment requires any official or employee of the executive branch to recuse themselves from the implementation of the Westlands settlement agreement if they were registered as a Federal lobbyist for Westlands in the past 5 years. Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

 Failed

16-24

Roll Call Link

 

Ammendment No.3

            Sponsor: Raul M. Grijalva (D)

                  Arizona's 3rd District

This amendment requires the Departments of Justice, Interior, and the Office of Management and Budget to affirm that the financial benefits of enacting the Westlands settlement agreement outweigh the costs before H.R. 1769 takes effect.  Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

16-24

Roll Call Link

 
H.R. 1807, Public Water Supply Invasive Species Compliance Act (Water, Power and Oceans), April 27, 2017

H.R. 1807 - Bill Text

Sponsor: Louie Gohmert (R)

Texas's 1st District

This bill would weaken the Lacey Act -- a bedrock conservation law and our strongest tool to prevent the spread of environmentally and economically destructive invasive species. The bill would allow transfers of water contaminated with invasive species across state lines undermining state and federal efforts to control or eradicate the species. Oppose

This bill is BAD for the environment

Passed

19-17

Roll Call Link

 

Ammendment No.1

            Sponsor: Alan Lowenthal (D)

                   California's 47th District

This amendment would require any water transfers exempted from the Lacy Act to be conveyed through a closed system and that any invasive species in the water be eradicated at a treatment facility before it enters another water body. This is the standard the Committee has required for Lacy Act exemptions the past to prevent harming the environment and taxpayers. Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

17-21

Roll Call Link

 
H.R. 1873, Electric Reliability and Forest Protection Act (Federal Lands; Water, Power and Oceans), April 27, 2017

H.R. 1873 - Bill Text

Sponsor: Doug LaMalfa (R)

California's 1st District

This bill would allow state and local governments and private organizations to override federal management of U.S. public lands. In addition, it would weaken environmental safeguards under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for forest thinning projects and shift liability for wildfire damages from utility corporations to taxpayers. The sponsor claims the bill addresses the threat of wildfires posed by dying trees and overgrown vegetation on and adjacent to electricity transmission rights-of-way (ROWs), but the bill would do little to address the threat because the ROW maintenance plans described in the bill are voluntary and owners of transmission lines can already works with Federal land managers to develop such plans. Oppose

This bill is BAD for the environment

Passed

24-14

Roll Call Link

 

H.J. Res. 69, Repeal of the F&WS Wildlife Protection Rule, February 16, 2017

H.J.Res 69 - Bill Text

Sponsor: Don Young (R)

Alaska's At-large District

This Congressional Review Act resolution abolishes a 2016 Fish & Wildlife Service rule that prohibits Alaska's so-called "predator control" activities on National Wildlife Refuge lands. Alaska's 16 national wildlife refuges conserve over 76 million acres of habitat, are supported by U.S. taxpayer dollars, and belong to all Americans -- not just inhabitants of the state. The rule, which applies to a relatively small portion of the available hunting lands in Alaska, prohibits the use of some of the most decimating and inhumane killing tactics on Refuges. The tactics include killing black and brown bear cubs or mothers with cubs, killing brown bears over bait, killing wolves and wolf pups in their dens, and shooting bears from a helicopter. The rule prevents American's wildlife refuges from being subjected to the state's predator control program that is not based on sound science and is not supported by the majority of Alaskans. Abolishing the F&WS rule gives away control of our public lands to state and private interests all while making it easier to slaughter wildlife.  Oppose

This resolution is BAD for the environment

 

Passed

225-193

Roll Call Link

H.R. 428, Red River Gradient Boundary Survey Act, February 14, 2017
H.R. 428 - Bill Text

Sponsor: Mac Thornberry (R)

Texas's 13th District

H.R. 428 removes the Federal Government's survey authority along 116 miles of the Red River, hands authority for the survey over to Texas and Oklahoma, and forces the government to accept the survey results completed by the states. If this wasn't bad enough, American taxpayers are required to cover the $1 million cost. The bill is one more Republican effort to transfer public lands to state and private ownership for the benefit of special interests. Oppose

This bill is BAD for the environment

 

Passed

250-171

Roll Call Link

H.J. Res. 44, Repeal of the Public Lands Planning Rule, February 7, 2017
H.J.Res 44 - Bill Text

Sponsor: Liz Cheney (R)

Wyoming's At-large District

This Congressional Review Act resolution abolishes a 2016 Bureau of Land Management rule known as Planning 2.0 that updates a 30-year-old public lands planning process. Planning 2.0 facilitates public participation, requires the best available science, and directs a landscape level approach to plan design, in order to better respond to climate change. These reforms make the planning process more nimble, transparent, and efficient. Planning 2.0 was developed with significant public input, including 3,354 public comments to the draft proposal. Scrapping this planning process will cost taxpayers money, and allows special interests like the oil and gas industry to continue to benefit from closed door deals and an antiquated decision-making process. Oppose

This resolution is BAD for the environment

 

Passed

234-186

Roll Call Link

Natural Resources Committee Oversight Plan for the 115th Congress, February 7, 2017

Committee Oversight Plan

Text

Sponsor: Rob Bishop (R)

Utah's 1st District

The Committee has oversight responsibilities to determine whether laws and programs addressing subjects within its jurisdiction are being implemented in accordance with the intent of Congress to determine whether they should be continued, reformed or curtailed. The Oversight Plan outlines the initial, primary focuses of the Committee during the 115th Congress.   Passed  

Ammendment No.1

            Sponsor: Alan Lowenthal (D)

                   California's 47th District

Modifies the existing oversight language on climate change to acknowledge that human activity is a major contributor to the problem.  Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

15-22

Roll Call Link

 

Ammendment No.2

            Sponsor: Jared Huffman (D)

                   California's 2nd District

States that the Committee will conduct oversight to protect American taxpayers from cases of self-dealing by Administration officials, including the President.  Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

15-21

Roll Call Link

 

Ammendment No.3

            Sponsor: Don Beyer, Jr. (D)

                   Virginia's 8th District

States the Committee will conduct oversight of the connections between illegal natural resources harvesting and trafficking and transnational organized crime, terrorism, and human rights abuses.  Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

15-19

Roll Call Link

 

Ammendment No.4

           Sponsor: Colleen Hanabusa (D)

                  Hawaii's 1st District

States that the Committee will conduct oversight into the episodes of violent extremism on public lands, and explore ways to prevent such actions from happening in the future. Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

14-20

Roll Call Link

 

Ammendment No.5

        Sponsor: A. Donald McEachin (D)

                   Virginia's 4th District

States that the Committee will conduct oversight of the ways that minority, low-income, rural, tribal and indigenous populations are impacted by issues within the Committee's jurisdiction. Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

14-19

Roll Call Link

 

Natural Resources Committee Rules for the 115th Congress, February 7, 2017

Committee Rules  

Text

Sponsor: Rob Bishop (R)

Utah's 1st District

The Committee Rules dictate the process and manner of how the Committee operates and conducts business, including hearing procedures, subcommittee jurisdictions, and committee reports.     Passed

21-13

Roll Call Link

 
 

Ammendment No.1

            Sponsor: Raúl Grijalva (D)

                   Arizona's 3rd District

Requires that committee reports include an estimate from the Congressional Budget Office of the fair market value for any federal land that has been proposed for sale or exchange. Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

12-22

Roll Call Link

 
 
 

Ammendment No.2

            Sponsor: Raúl Grijalva (D)

                    Arizona's 3rd District

Requires that all materials that the Committee receives in response to a Committee subpoena be considered official committee records. This would mean that subpoenaed materials were the property of the House and all Members would have access to them in accordance with House Rules.   Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

13-21

Roll Call Link

 
 
 

Ammendment No.3

            Sponsor: Jared Huffman (D)

                    California's 2nd District

Requires that any civilian witness invited to testify, who is appointed by the President, will disclose any financial connection that exists between themselves and any entity that's directly related to the subject of the hearing. Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

Failed

12-21

Roll Call Link

 
 
H.J.Res 36, Repeal of the BLM Methane Waste Prevention Rule, February 3, 2017
H.J.Res 36Bill Text

Sponsor: Rob Bishop (R)

Utah's 1st District

Through the use of the Congressional Review Act, this resolution abolishes a 2016 Interior Department rule that updates 36-year-old methane pollution regulations. The new Methane Waste Prevention Rule addresses the intentional release, intentional burning, and leakage of natural gas (methane) from new and existing oil and gas facilities on federal lands. The rule would save up to 41 billion cubic feet of natural gas per year, enough to supply up to 740,000 households and bring in up to $14 million in additional royalties to states and the federal treasury. Additionally, the rule would help prevent methane pollution that contributes to climate change and ground-level ozone, which pollutes our air and can cause and exacerbate asthma attacks in children. Repealing this rule eliminates a protection for clean air, the climate, and ordinary taxpayers and gives a handout to Republicans' wealthy industry friends.   Oppose

This resolution is BAD for the environment

 

Passed

221-191

Roll Call Link

H.J.Res 38, Repeal of the Interior Department Stream Protection Rule, February 1, 2017
H.J.Res 38 - Bill Text

Sponsor: Bill Johnson (R)

Ohio's 6th District

Through the use of the Congressional Review Act, this resolution abolishes a 2016 Interior Department rule that updates 30-year-old coal mining regulations. The new Stream Protection Rule was designed to protect people and the environment from the adverse impacts of coal mining, such as buried streams, floods, and subsidence. It's estimated that the Stream Protection Rule would protect or restore roughly 6,000 miles of streams and 52,000 acres of forests over two decades, and create approximately 156 new full-time jobs. Repealing this protective rule subjects coal communities to more polluted water and ill health.    Oppose

This resolution is BAD for the environment

 

Passed

228-194

Roll Call Link

H.R. 26, Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act, January 5, 2017


H.R. 26 - Bill Text

Sponsor: Doug Collins (R)

Georgia's 9th District

This bill would give Congress the power to veto any regulation with an estimated economic impact of $100 million or more, regardless of the associated benefits for public health, safety, or the environment. Taking the authority to implement laws away from expert executive branch agencies is not only unconstitutional; it gives big corporate polluters yet another advantage over regular people.  Oppose

This bill is BAD for the environment

 

Passed

237-187

Roll Call Link


Ammendment No.3

            Sponsor: Raúl Grijalva (D)

Arizona's 3rd District

This amendment would have required an analysis of the carbon pollution associated with any regulation, as well as the impacts on low income and rural communities likely to be negatively impacted by the rule. The health and welfare of the American people is more important than the health of big corporations' bottom lines.  Support

This amendment is GOOD for the environment

  Failed

193-230

Roll Call Link